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Sex sells, but social media sells more

We’re all familiar with the notion that “sex sells” and we only have to flick through a few pages of glossy magazines to see this notion in action. As individuals, we can be guilty of using our sultriest shots for our Twitter account or for our Facebook photos. It’s apparent that most of us aren’t batting an eyelid at how we’re choosing to present ourselves online.

 

Yet, even though we’ve become somewhat desensitised to provocative campaigns, there’s still a line that we seem to draw in society. News swept around the social media sphere recently that preppy clothing brand Jack Wills has been forced to pull part of its spring catalogue by the Advertising Standards Authority for “offensive” nudity as the images went “beyond what could be described as fun or flirtatious”. Jack Wills is no stranger to causing controversy though, and as a brand that sells itself as …

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Sex sells, Social Media influences

Social Media created a power that everyone wants to harness, for several different reasons. Many people use this power for good, and those that try to use it for evil will quickly be burned. I am referring to the Influencer Model, a marketing method previously known as Brand Ambassadors. Sex is the most common example of a Brand Ambassador: and boy did it sell.

 

The Brand Ambassador is responsible for increasing company awareness, and spreading product details. Prior to web 2.0, and long before Social Media, we based our purchasing habits on TV and print advertising. We received marketing messages through attractive, bubbly individuals that only needed to know what was printed on the company one-sheet. Many brands, aahhhem … beer industry … only needed a hot girl to smile, and in rolled the sales.

 

Under that system, brands controlled the information. Companies could write anything, and …

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Social Media Is Reshaping Sex Work—But Also Threatening It

One morning last May, Melody Kush discovered that someone was using her Twitter photos to catfish people into paying for a Snapchat premium account that didn’t even exist. Kush is a sex worker—an erotic model, to be precise—and for someone who does much of her work via social media, these kinds of scams aren’t just an inconvenience. It’s an existential threat to her brand. She asked the imitator to stop; they refused, and blocked her. So she screenshotted the person’s snapcode and asked her 114,000-person Twitter following to report the account for her.

 

The next day, her Twitter account was permanently deleted—right before she was supposed to teach a social media seminar. “I lost all my content and my entire business,” she says.

 

To Kush, the only possible explanation is that someone (likely the catfisher) reported her for a non-nude but suggestive photo in her header. “I was …

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Sex Sells: It’s everywhere, but does it make it right?

It would come as no surprise to know that the theme of sex is very prevalent in the advertising and marketing world. Both men and women are sexualised in order to promote and sell products. The worst thing? We are so accustomed to it, we no longer bat an eyelid. A semi naked Paris Hilton promoting burgers? Sure, alright. Topless (and headless — apparently their face isn’t that important) men on the campaigns for Hollister and Abercrombie & Fitch? Over it. But when does the line between using sex as a marketing technique start to cross into the territory of being objectifying and just plain offensive? And to be honest, is it as necessary as the industry would have us believe?

 

Throughout history the idea of ‘sex sells’ has been prominent in advertising dating as far back as the 1950’s. Whereas then the focus was on presenting women’s sole …

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Study details link between social media and sex trafficking

Social media is increasingly being exploited to contact, recruit and sell children for sex, according to a study by The University of Toledo Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute.

 

The study, which was requested by the Ohio Attorney General’s Human Trafficking Commission, reveals how traffickers quickly target and connect with vulnerable children on the Internet through social media.

 

“It is vitally important to educate parents, professionals and youth—especially our middle school or teenage daughters who may be insecure—about the dangers of online predatory practices used by master manipulators,” said Dr. Celia Williamson, UT professor of social work and director of the UT Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute. “Through this outreach and education, we can help save children from becoming victims of modern-day slavery.”

 

“We know predators are using the internet to find their victims, and this eye-opening study highlights what a predator looks for in a